COVID-19 Boosters: Key Points and Recommendations

older couple having lunch together

Recently recommended boosters are adding an additional layer of protection for at-risk populations.

Who is eligible?

At this time, not everyone is eligible to receive a booster shot. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), boosters are available to the following groups after six months of initial vaccination:

Which vaccines have boosters?

COVID-19 vaccines on the market have boosters available – Pfizer/BioNTech, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson. Unlike the first shot(s) in the series, eligible individuals may choose which vaccine they receive as a booster – the “mix-and-match” strategy, according to the New York Times.

Are boosters necessary?

COVID-19 boosters were designed to provide an additional layer of protection from severe COVID-19 illness. There is disagreement, however, among scientists on the need for these boosters:

“…with the exception of adults over age 65, the vast majority of Americans are already well protected against severe illness and do not need booster shots,” claimed advisers to the CDC and to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The real issue at hand is not distributing a booster shot. The issue is the same as it was months ago – educating those who still refuse to get the COVID-19 vaccine to protect themselves from serious illness. For a comprehensive guide on having effective conversations around the benefits of vaccination, download Building Vaccine Confidence Within Your Workplace.

When will boosters be available?

Boosters are available now throughout metro Detroit. According to the recommendation, eligible groups should get a booster dose six months after primary Pfizer/BioNTech or Moderna series or two months after a single dose of Johnson & Johnson.

If you are eligible for a booster shot, contact your local health department or local pharmacy for more information on scheduling an appointment.